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Joel R. Reidenberg Northeast Privacy Scholars Workshop

The members of the program committee and Northeastern Law’s Center for Law, Information and Creativity (CLIC) are excited to announce this Call for Submissions for the Joel R. Reidenberg Northeast Privacy Scholars Workshop (NPSW), to be held on November 11, 2022, at NYU School of Law in New York City.

Abstracts/Submissions due Monday, September 12, 2022 by 5 PM Eastern

Papers/Precis due October 21, 2022

The Workshop

The NPSW, now in its fifth year and generously sponsored by Microsoft, offers privacy scholars from diverse fields the opportunity to receive extensive, constructive commentary on their works in progress.

We invite submissions on a variety of privacy-related topics and from a wide range of disciplines, including, but not limited to, law, social science, computer science, engineering, communications and public policy.

We designate workshop slots to students, including current JD, Masters, PhD and joint degree students, so we can help welcome new scholars into our field. If you are a current student submitting a paper, please indicate that on the submission form.

Call for Submissions

We invite submissions on a variety of privacy-related topics and from a wide range of disciplines, including, but not limited to, law, social science, computer science, engineering, communications and public policy.

Starting this year, we are designating workshop slots to students, including current JD, master’s, PhD and joint-degree students, so we can help welcome new scholars into our field. If you are a current student submitting a paper, please indicate that on the submission form.

Format and Types of Projects/Papers

The Workshop format is designed to facilitate discussion and commentary on early stage papers and projects. As in previous years, substantial time (60 minutes) will be allotted for papers that are sufficiently developed to be read and critiqued, but not yet submitted for publication. Two to three “lightning” sessions of 20 minutes will be allocated to emerging projects at the precis stage. There will be no presentations at the Workshop; only brief commentary and feedback from participants.

We are discussing the format of this year's Workshop, but our plan is to hold an in-person Workshop. Part of the strength of workshopping papers is meeting each other, talking over ideas during breaks, and getting to know the members of our community. That said, we recognize that attending conferences in person is a matter of privilege: Those who are immunocompromised may not feel comfortable attending in person just yet; those with young children or elders to care for may feel the same. Plus, even before COVID, attending in-person conferences was easier for those scholars with research budgets. Doing so was always harder for those in our community living with disabilities. The Program Committee will determine format with an eye toward inclusion. We will keep a keen eye on COVID infection rates and hospitalizations, with contingency plans ready. Stay tuned for more information.

Eligibility

All privacy scholars (and even those who do not consider themselves privacy scholars),from a variety of disciplines, are welcome to submit an abstract for consideration. We value quality, potential contribution to the literature, novelty, interdisciplinary approaches, and new and exciting perspectives. We also value diversity on multiple metrics, especially for members of groups traditionally under-represented in the academy, including persons of color, women, members of the LGBTQ community and those living with disabilities.

A preference will be given to those in the northeast region, but we have had scholars from all over the world workshop their papers. In addition, in keeping with our goals of constructive feedback, diversity and interdisciplinary scholarship, no one can be a designated author on a paper two years in a row. In other words, for single-author papers, the same author cannot have a paper workshopped in consecutive years. Multi-author papers are eligible for workshop in consecutive years, but the designated (first) author must be different to be workshopped two years in a row. Since the Workshop was on hiatus last year due to COVID, everyone is eligible to participate. For those selected for full, 60-minute workshops, a draft paper will be required by October 21, 2022. For those selected for “lightning” sessions, a 3-page precis will be due the same day.

How to Submit

Interested scholars can click here to:
  1. submit an abstract of between 500 and 700 words, specifying whether the submission is for a traditional paper session or a lightning session, along with a list of references or,
  2. volunteer to serve as a commentator
The Program Committee, which will select from among the submitted abstracts, includes:
  • Steve Bellovin, Columbia University, Department of Computer Science
  • Yafit Lev-Aretz, City University of New York, Zicklin School of Business
  • Helen Nissenbaum, Cornell Tech
  • Paul Ohm, Georgetown University, Georgetown Law Center
  • Katherine Strandburg, New York University, School of Law
  • Joseph Turow, University of Pennsylvania, Annenberg School of Communications
  • Ari Waldman, Northeastern University, School of Law and Khoury College of Computer Science (Chair)
We look forward to your submission and expect another stimulating conversation. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Nasser Eledroos, managing director of CLIC, at clic@northeastern.edu.
Sponsored by: 

November 11, 2022

9:00 am to 5:00 pm