2022 - 2023

September 20, 2022
PPE Speaker Series: Professor Margaret Burnham
Join Northeastern University’s Politics, Philosophy, and Economics program for a lecture and Q&A event with Professor Margaret Burnham, director of Northeastern Law’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project and faculty co-director of its Center for Law, Equity and Race (CLEAR).

October 7, 2022
By Hands Now Known: The Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Archive

Join CRRJ for an all-day hybrid conference celebrating the launch of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Burnes-Nobles Archive and Professor Margaret Burnham’s new book, By Hands Now Known: Jim Crow’s Legal Executioners.

March 31, 2022
Cradle-to-Prison Pipeline Conference at Northeastern Law

Celebrating Three Years of the Cradle-to-Prison Pipeline Project

  • October 20, 2021
    Police Accountability: A Discussion with Deborah Ramirez
    One of the central concerns about how to produce more equitable and just outcomes has been how to make the police accountable for their misconduct. On Wednesday, October 20, Professor Deborah Ramirez joined the Harvard Kennedy School's Reimagining Community Safety Speaker Series to discuss her four-part solution, which includes restricting police union’s collective bargaining and narrowing qualified immunity by using professional liability insurance, efforts that should save lives by detecting, preventing, and deterring police misconduct.


    December 1, 2021
    Racial Redress and Reparations: Policy Approaches to Remediating Historical Racial Injustice
    Recent years have seen heightened calls for the redress and remediation of historical racial injustice. Policymakers have responded with initiatives that take meaningful steps to address the United States’ long legacy of racial violence and injustice. This convening, sponsored by Northeastern Law's Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ) and the NU School of Public Policy, took a close look at the current laws and proposals put forth by those legislators and public officials who are at the forefront of these efforts.


    December 1, 2021 | 6:00 - 8:00 PM | Zoom
    Myra Kraft Open Classroom: Plunder, Reparations and Restorative Justice
    Watch Professor Margaret Burnham, director of Northeastern Law’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project, in conversation with Menachem Kaiser, author of Plunder: A Memoir of Family Property and Nazi Treasure, a memoir which recounts his family’s efforts to recover property left behind in Poland after the Holocaust.


    December 3, 2021
    Celebrating 50 Years of Black Excellence
    Northeastern Law’s Black Law Students Association (BLSA) Kemet Chapter was founded in 1971. On December 3, 2021, the Northeastern Law community celebrated the 50th anniversary of BLSA at the School of Law with a celebratory event featuring commemorative speeches, hors d’oeuvres and cocktails. We heard from Dean James Hackney, keynote speaker Rachael Rollins ’97 and Genevievre Miller ’23, the current BLSA chair.


    January 17, 2022
    A Tribute to the Dream
    The Northeastern community gathered on Monday, January 17, 2022, to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. The university’s annual event, “A Tribute to the Dream: Voting Rights and the ‘Threat to Justice Everywhere,’” was streamed on Facebook and featured a video tribute by the Reverend Willie Bodrick II ’20, senior pastor at Boston’s Twelfth Baptist Church. “What encourages me from Dr. King is that in his moment, he knew it was his time," said Bodrick. "And in this moment, I know that it's my time."

    >> Watch Bodrick's video tribute

    The year's theme was inspired by the phrase “good trouble,” famously coined by the late US Rep. John Lewis—whose life and work made a lasting mark on the civil rights movement, sparked meaningful action and change in the name of justice and contributed to progress across the nation.

    Professor Margaret Burnham, founder and director of Northeastern Law’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project and the Center Center for Law, Equity and Race (CLEAR), sat down with Régine Jean-Charles, director of Northeastern University’s Africana Studies Program and author of A Trumpet of Conscience for the 21st Century: King’s Call to Justice, for a fireside chat.
    >> Watch Professor Burnham's fireside chat


    January 31 - February 2, 2022
    Winter 2022 Daynard Public Interest Law Fellow: Keesha Gaskins-Nathan '99

    Keesha Gaskins-Nathan '99 returned to the law school in January 2022 as a Daynard Distinguished Visiting Fellow. A long-time organizer, lobbyist and trial attorney, Gaskins-Nathan is director of the Democratic Practice–United States program at the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Throughout her career, she has advanced measures and ideas that improve democratic systems and engage democratic culture in the United States to support full and fair democratic and economic opportunity for all residents


    April 6, 2022
    CRRJ Workshop Series Book Talk: The Silent Shore
    Join the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project for a conversation with Professor Charles Chavis, Jr., assistant professor of Conflict Resolution and History at George Mason University. Professor Chavis will discuss his book, The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State.


    April 13, 2022
    Valerie Gordon Human Rights Lecture: Tiffany Joseph
    Displacement, Citizenship and Human Rights Challenges for the 21st Century
    Displacement is an important topic of academic and societal discourse as the number of people on the move globally continues to rise amid socio-economic, political and environmental changes. Professor Tiffany Joseph will discuss the connection between displacement, racial and ethnic relations, the social safety net and its implications for the meaning of citizenship and human rights in the 21st century.


    Confronting Racial Injustice 2022 Series
    Massachusetts is often heralded as the home of the abolition movement and one of the first states to abolish slavery. Yet the Commonwealth’s economy developed in collaboration with states that claimed people as property. This series explored how enslavement and white supremacy shaped the history of Massachusetts and how they continue to shape its present. Developed by Northeastern Law's Criminal Justice Task Force, Confronting Racial Injustice is a free series of online conversations hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and sponsored by a number of Boston-area organizations.

    Thursday, April 28, 2022 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM | Online Event
    Confronting Economic Injustice: The Story of Parcel C

    Boston’s Chinatown has long been the physical, economic, and cultural center for Chinese immigrants.  Chinatown has also long fought for community control of affordable housing and economic justice. Join us for a conversation about the story of Parcel C, Chinatown’s success in fighting against institutional expansion and reclaiming this parcel for community use.

    Panelists:
    Michael Liu
    Author, Forever Struggle: Activism, Identity and Survival in Boston’s Chinatown
    David Moy
    Program Officer, Hyams Foundation; Lydia Lowe, Chinatown Community Land Trust
    Lydia Lowe
    Director, Chinatown Community Land Trust
    Carolyn Chou
    Executive Director, Asian American Resource Workshop

    Moderator: 
    Margaret Woo
    Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law
    >> Register to attend online


    May 6, 2022
    Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health – What’s Up With That????
    A discussion on the draft opinion in the abortion case that would overrule Roe v. Wade.

    Host:
    Deborah Jackson
    Managing Director, Center for Law, Equity and Race

    In Conversation With:
    Libby Adler, Professor of Law and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Northeastern University School of Law
    Martha Davis, University Distinguished Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law
    Amy Farrell, Director and Professor, Northeastern University School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
    Suzanna Danuta Walters, Professor of Sociology, and Professor and Director, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Northeastern University College of Social Sciences and Humanities


    May 13, 2022
    Brown Forum | Women in the Law Conference
    Professors Margaret Burnham and Deborah Ramirez, co-directors of Northeastern Law’s new Center for Law, Equity and Race (CLEAR), have been confirmed as the fireside keynotes at the upcoming Brown Forum | Women in the Law Conference on May 13. They will talk about their long and impressive careers, racial inequality and the work they are doing with CLEAR to address today’s challenges and provide tomorrow’s solutions for the nation’s most complex social challenges.


    May 18, 2022 | 12:00 - 1:15 PM | Zoom
    Buffalo: In Tribute and Solidarity
    We mourn with Buffalo communities and share their grief. We stand in support and solidarity. We struggle against the racial violence that touches every facet of our country’s experience. Join us as we listen to voices in song and spoken word from Buffalo and Northeastern.


    May 18, 2022 | 4:00 - 5:00 PM | Zoom
    Denise Carty-Bennia Memorial Bar Awards Reception

    The 29th annual Denise Carty-Bennia Memorial Bar Awards Reception will be held virtually on Wednesday, May 18. The Reverend Willie Bodrick II ’20 will deliver the keynote address.


    Thursday, May 26, 2022 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM | Online Event
    Confronting Racial Injustice: Rising Asian American Voices

    Anti-Asian violence is not new.  Join us for a conversation about the history of racial violence against Asian Americans and the recent rise of Asian American voices.

    Panelists:
    Paul Lee
    Retired Partner, Goodwin Procter
    Phil Tajitsu Nash
    Board Member, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund
    The Honorable Tram Nguyen ’13
    State Representative, 18th Essex District

    Pre-recorded Remarks by Boston Mayor Michelle Wu

    Moderator: 
    The Honorable Catherine Ham
    Associate Justice, Massachusetts Superior Court

  • Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM 
    Lynching: Reparations as Restorative Justice
    A significant and timely conference on reparations as a form of restorative justice for the families of lynching victims, hosted by the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ) and Africana Studies Program at Northeastern University.
    Special guests: Ta-Nehisi Coates, Angela Y. Davis and Congressperson Sheila Jackson Lee

    Confronting Racial Injustice
    Massachusetts is often heralded as the home of the abolition movement and one of the first states to abolish slavery. Yet the Commonwealth’s economy developed in collaboration with states that claimed people as property. This series explored how enslavement and white supremacy shaped the history of Massachusetts and how they continue to shape its present. From the first program “Slavery and Wealth Creation” to the final event “The Charles Stuart Story: White Lies and Black Lives,” the series asked us all to understand, acknowledge and confront racial injustice.

    Developed by Northeastern Law's Criminal Justice Task Force, Confronting Racial Injustice is a free, five-part series hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and sponsored by a number of Boston-area organizations.

    February 18, 2021 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM
    Slavery, Wealth Creation, and Intergenerational Wealth

    March 11, 2021 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM
    Redlining: From Slavery to $8 in 400 Years

    April 15, 2021 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM
    Boston School Desegregation Through the Rearview Mirror

    May 19, 2021 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM
    The War on Drugs in Massachusetts: The Racial Impact of the School Zone Law and Other Mandatory Minimum Sentences

    June 9, 2021 | 6:00 - 7:00 PM
    The Charles Stuart Story: White Lies and Black Lives

    Wednesday, March 17, 2021 | 4:00 - 5:30 PM 
    CRRJ Workshop: Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission
    A conversation with Maya Davis about the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Maya Davis is a member of the Maryland Lynching Commission, Senior Research Archivist for the Study of the Legacy of Slavery in Maryland, and Executive Director for the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture.

    Wednesday, April 28, 2021 | 5:00 - 6:00 PM
    Has Justice Been Served? Reflections on the guilty verdict of Derek Chauvin
    Northeastern faculty, student and staff panelists offered reflections on the verdicts in the landmark Derek Chauvin trial, and considered whether this moment marks a turning point in the nation’s acknowledgment of, and accountability for, racial justice. Professor Margaret Burnham, director of the law school’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project, spoke at this panel and told News@Northeastern, “This was a moment that affirms the humanity of Black people. The verdict restores a kind of moral balance ....”

  • March 25, 2020
    Film Screening: The Silence of Others
    A screening of The Silence of Others, an award-winning documentary directed by Robert Bahar and Almudena Carracedo.

    CRRJ workshop featuring Shytierra Gaston, Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Northeastern University College of Social Sciences and Humanities.

    Friday, May 1, 2020
    Racial Justice, Restoration and Inclusion: Human Rights Principles and Local Practice
    This program explored the relevance of human rights norms in efforts to advance racial justice and address historical and ongoing racism, discrimination and intolerance. Speakers examined strategies to shape effective remedies and redress, including reparations abnd restorative justice, drawing from international, national and local examples. Panelists included Carmelyn Malalis ’01, chair of the New York City Human Rights Commission. Professor Margaret Burnham, faculty director of Northeastern Law's Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ), delivered the keynote address.

    Monday, June 8, 2020
    How Do We Restore Justice for George Floyd?
    A FacebookLive discussion led by Professor Margaret Burnham about civil rights and restorative justice. This discussion was one in a series of events in which we will gather in solidarity to confront racial injustice and chart the course for lasting change.

    Wednesday, June 17, 2020
    Connecting with NUSL Centers and Projects Around Racism and Police Brutality
    The Center for Public Interest Advocacy and Collaboration (CPIAC); Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity (CLIC); Center for Health Policy and Law (CHPL), Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy (PHRGE), Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ) and NuLawLab invited Northeastern Law students to a virtual meeting to discuss the ways the School of Law's centers and projects can collaborate with and support students in our responses to ongoing structural racism and police brutality.

  • October 20, 2018
    Past Harms, Present Remedies: Law Enforcement and Families Affected by Historical Police Violence in Conversation
    Before cell phones and body cameras, African Americans who were killed because of the actions of law enforcement officers had virtually no recourse to courts or justice. Although their cases were ignored by public officials for decades, today families and communities are unearthing the stories of these lost lives and calling for recognition and repair from local police departments and other government leaders. CRRJ is convening a public gathering in New Orleans on Saturday, October 20, 2018, at Loyola College of Law to talk about the impact of deaths at the hands of police in the mid-twentieth century on today’s initiatives to improve police accountability and police-community relations.

    October 24, 2018 | 4:00 PM | 360 Dockser Hall
    CRRJ Workshop Series | Lift Every Voice: A Way to Meaningful Repair
    Linda J. Mann, Visiting Scholar, Alliance for Historical Dialogue & Accountability at Columbia University; VP of Research for the Georgetown Memory Project (GMP)
    Dr. Mann will discuss the GMP’s project identifying and locating 300 enslaved people sold by Georgetown University and the Maryland Jesuits to plantations in Louisiana in 1838 and tracing their direct descendants.

    October 30, 2018 | 4:00 PM | 240 Dockser Hall
    Sighted Eyes | Feeling Heart
    Screening of Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart, a documentary directed by Tracy Heather Strain, Northeastern Professor of Media and Screen Studies and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker. The screening was followed by a conversation with the Tracy Heather Strain and a panel featuring Professor Margaret Burnham, Director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project.

    November 14, 2018
    CRRJ Workshop Series: Freedom’s Cost: Children & Youth in the Black Freedom Struggle

    Francoise Hamlin, Africana Studies and History, Brown University Dr. Hamlin’s project positions children and youth at the center of the postwar African American civil rights movements by addressing activism’s personal and communal costs.

    December 12, 2018
    CRRJ Workshop Series: Silences and Erasures
    Diane Harriford, Africana Studies, Women’s Studies and Sociology, Vassar College; Visiting Scholar, CRRJ
    Dr. Harriford is utilizing the CRRJ-Nobles Archive to examine the intersection of gender and sexuality with the racial violence documented there.  She explores, in the context of this violence, women’s resistance, the impact of heterosexual or homosexual affective ties across race, and black and white masculine identity.

    January 25, 2019
    Tribute to the Dream: A Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
    On January 25, the Northeastern community gathered to pay homage to the life and values of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through the power of film, music and conversation. The event featured the premier of “Murder in Mobile,” a documentary featuring the law school’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Clinic (CRRJ) and the 1948 murder of Rayfield Davis, whose case was unearthed and investigated by Chelsea Schmitz ’13. Danielle Ponder ’11 (right) set the tone for the premiere with her band, The Tomorrow People.

    Following the screening, Professor Margaret Burnham, founder and director of CRRJ, conversed with Professor Roderick L. Ireland, former chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. “The accounting that we’re doing, the accumulating of cases, is in part a response to Martin Luther King’s challenge that there is an unpaid debt,” Burnham said. “Because those stories have to be told in order for us fully to understand our history. Simply collecting material is not enough."

    Murder in Mobile

    June 22, 2019
    Murder in Mobile Screening at the Roxbury International Film Festival
    Murder in Mobile continued its festival run with a screening at the Roxbury International Film Festival. The inspiring short documentary which highlights the work of NUSL's Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Clinic (CRRJ) was be shown at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston on Saturday, June 22, at 12:30 p.m.

    June 26, 2019
    CRRJ Workshop Series: Interpretive Limitations of Genetic Ancestry Testing and the Case for Reparations
    Featuring 
    Jada Benn Torres, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Genetic Anthropology and Biocultural Studies Laboratory, Vanderbilt University

     

  • October 20-21, 2017 | Birmingham Civil Rights Institute
    Resurrecting Their Stories: A Community-based Oral History Project
    Proudly presented by NUSL's Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ), The Elmore Bolling Foundation and Alabama NAACP.

    June 9-11, 2017
    Resurrecting Their Stories: A Community-based Oral History Project
    Proudly presented by NUSL's Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ), Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Tuskegee University Archives, The Elmore Bolling Foundation and Alabama NAACP.

    June 17, 2017
    Reparative Justice and Social Healing: Research and Reflection on Historic Violence
    Proudly presented as part of the National Association of Community and Restorative Justice’s Sixth National Conference, this three-hour session will bring together artists, activists and researchers to think creatively about the national movement to come to terms with, and transcend, historic racial violence.

    January 26, 2018 | Northeastern University School of Law
    Digital Red Records
    A workshop, hosted by CRRJ, on digital collections covering historical racial violence in the United States.

    March 3, 2018 | Selma, Alabama
    Resurrecting Their Stories: A Community-based Oral History Project
    The third in a three-part symposium series. Prior workshops were held at Tuskegee University and the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

    March 10, 2018 |  West Point, Georgia
    Henry “Peg” Gilbert and Mae Gilbert: Honoring Their Lives and Restoring Justice
    Professor Margaret Burnham and Tara Dunn ’17 joined the family of Henry “Peg” Gilbert and Mae Gilbert for an event reflecting on their lives and recalling the police murder of Henry Gilbert in 1947.

    March 17, 2018 | Natchez, Mississippi
    CRRJ Honors Samuel Mason Bacon 
    Professor Margaret Burnham, Kaylie Simon and Mary Nguyen ’14 joined the family of Samuel Bacon at the Natchez Museum of African American History and Culture to honor the life and legacy of Samuel Bacon.

    August 18, 2018
    Recalling Their Names: Racial Terror in Jim Crow Mobile
    The Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project’s (CRRJ) investigation of six Jim Crow-era murders will be featured in an exhibit, “Murders in Mobile,” opening August 18 at the History Museum of Mobile in Alabama. In addition, a Mobile street will be named in honor of Rayfield Davis, one of the murder victims.